What’s Your Natural Writing Voice?

VoiceOne of my favorite writing blogs is Writers in the Storm, hosted by four wonderful women and featuring articles that run the gamut on the craft of writing, the writer’s life, and the publishing business. I was thrilled to get to add my two cents to their blog in a recent post on How to Embrace Your Natural Voice.

I share my story of learning about my natural writing voice and tips on how to discover and embrace your own voice.

Here’s a teaser and then the link where you can find the article:

When I first began writing novels, I longed to pen my prose like the literary greats I’d read in high school and college. Jane Austen, Thomas Hardy, Edgar Allen Poe, Leo Tolstoy, etc. were my beacons of beautiful prose.

But alas, their light flickered on me. Because I couldn’t seem to get two pages in without snark coming out on the page. So much for my lofty plans.

I’m not the only one who wanted or expected a different writing voice.

Read the rest.

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Not a Pantser. Not a Plotter. I’m a Puzzler.

What’s your writing process?

It’s such a common question for authors, and one most writers I know give a great deal of thought. Because we don’t simply hatch one day fully grown as authors who know exactly the best way to write books.

The best writers learn story structure, prose techniques, characterization, emotional depth, and all the good “craft” stuff that makes our writing shine. Good writing can be studied and learned, and we all want that destination of a story well told. But HOW we get from Point A to Point B differs from writer to writer. It can take a while to figure out your own best practices.

When I began writing, I was pretty much a pantser — that is, someone who free writes, by the “seat of my pants.” The story just came out on the page, and I went wherever it took me.

After a while, I decided I was a recovering pantser, though still not a plotter — someone who plans storyline and characters and plot points and scenes in advance. Still, I dove more into outlines and timelines and character sheets.

Then I did something really weird: I drafted two novels out of order. That is, I came up with a general outline, then wrote a scene here, a scene there, another scene here. I didn’t write the story chronologically, but plugged in scenes as they came to me. When finished, I had to work out transitions and flow. But all in all, it sort of worked for me.

One of my writer friends, Jenny Hansen, calls it “story quilting.” Which is a great metaphor. I’m not the least bit crafty, though, so “quilting” was a bit hard for me to connect with.

Not a Pantser. Not a Plotter. I'm a Puzzler. via Julie Glover
I’m a Puzzler.

But I love puzzles. Whether it’s jigsaw puzzles or crossword puzzles or brain teasers or mysteries, I love a good puzzle. I like working on a section at a time, then moving to another, and then another, until it all comes together.

The other day I realized my current writing process is like working a puzzle — a piece here and a piece there, until I have all the pieces fitting together just so and a complete image forms. I start with a solid outline and major characters, like building the corners of a jigsaw puzzle first, but then I let myself write scenes in whatever order I want. Slowly but surely, I build the novel and see the full picture getting clearer and clearer.

Is this a typical way to write? No, it’s not. Which is probably why it’s taken me so long to fess up to this process working for me. But somehow, it does.

My takeaway is that writers should master their craft, but experiment with their process. When someone suggests “the way” to write, it might work great for that someone, but not so much for you. Be willing to try different things, and see which approach brings out your best story.

Maybe you’re a pantser. Maybe you’re a plotter. And maybe a few of you out there are puzzlers, like me.

My Writing Process: Vlog Edition

My lovely friend and author extraordinaire Christina Delay tagged me in the Writing Process Blog Hop. Christina writes fabulous young adult novels with a mythological bent. If you want to check out her writing process, click here.

Since I’d written before about my writing process, I decided to give this one a go through video. Hope you enjoy my vlog answers!

I’m tagging three writers, all of whom I recently saw at the RWA Conference in San Antonio: Diana Beebe, Callene Rapp, and Angela Quarles. As usual, if you’ve already participated or want to pass, feel free to skip.

The questions:

  1. What are you working on right now?
  2. How does your writing differ from others in your genre?
  3. Why do you write what you do?
  4. How does your writing process work?

Readers, feel free to answer any of those questions below!